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Cash handling machines have become increasingly important in today's economy, as businesses and financial institutions seek to streamline their cash management processes. One critical function of cash handling machines is to detect counterfeit bills, ensuring that businesses can accurately and efficiently process cash transactions. To achieve this, cash handling machines use a variety of counterfeit detection technologies, including CIS, IR, MG, MT, WM, CD, SD, and TD. In this article, we will explore the meanings of these professional terms and how they are used to detect counterfeit bills in cash handling machines.

Note: Unlike other ordinary cash counting machines on the market, Ribao Technology’s cash counting machines have all these advanced counterfeit detection technologies, giving you comprehensive and reliable protection against fake bills.

CIS (Contact Image Sensor) Detection

Definition: Contact Image Sensor (CIS) detection is a technology that captures high-resolution images of banknotes for authentication, denomination recognition, and counterfeit detection.

Explanation: In cash handling machines, CIS technology involves the use of a linear array of image sensors placed very close to the surface of the banknote. This setup allows for the capture of detailed images, even from banknotes that are worn or in poor condition. To ensure the clarity and consistency of the images captured, CIS calibration is performed, similar to how a camera focuses. This calibration process ensures that the CIS sensors are properly aligned and functioning at their optimal capacity.

Once calibrated, the CIS sensors require samples of genuine banknotes to function effectively. These samples serve as a reference for the machine, allowing it to recognize authentic currency and detect counterfeit bills. Typically, white light images are used for recognition purposes, while infrared images are used for counterfeit detection. The white light images capture the visible patterns on the banknote, while the infrared images reveal special ink and patterns made with controlled infrared ink, adding an additional layer of security.

Examples: CIS detection is used in conjunction with other counterfeit detection technologies to provide a comprehensive solution for authenticating banknotes. It can capture fine details such as micro-printing and intricate patterns, which are challenging to replicate in counterfeit bills. Additionally, the ability to capture infrared images allows the machine to detect security features that are not visible to the naked eye, further enhancing its ability to identify fake currency.

IR (Infrared Detection)

Definition: Infrared detection (IR) is a technology that uses infrared light to identify and authenticate currency.

Explanation: Cash handling machines equipped with IR technology scan banknotes using infrared light, which can reveal unique patterns or characteristics invisible to the naked eye. This technology is especially effective in identifying counterfeit bills, as they often lack the specific IR features found in genuine currency.

Examples: Infrared detection is used to identify counterfeit bills by examining the presence or absence of specific security features, such as infrared ink or unique patterns on the banknote that only appear under IR light.

MG (Magnetic Detection)

Definition: Magnetic detection (MG) is a technology that uses magnetic sensors to authenticate currency based on their magnetic properties.

Explanation: Cash handling machines with MG technology can detect the magnetic ink and other magnetic features present in genuine banknotes. Counterfeit bills often lack these magnetic characteristics, making them easier to identify.

magnetic counterfeit detection

Examples: Magnetic detection is used to identify counterfeit bills by analyzing the presence of magnetic ink in specific areas of the banknote, such as serial numbers and security threads.

MT (Metal Thread Detection)

Definition: Metal thread detection (MT) is a technology that detects the presence of metallic security threads embedded in genuine banknotes.

Explanation: Cash handling machines with MT technology use sensors to detect the metal threads present in genuine currency. These threads are difficult to replicate in counterfeit bills, making MT an effective method for detecting fakes.

Examples: Metal thread detection is used to identify counterfeit bills by verifying the presence of the metallic security thread in the correct position and with the appropriate width.

WM (Watermark Detection)

Definition: Watermark detection (WM) is a technology that identifies the unique watermarks found in genuine banknotes.

Explanation: Cash handling machines with WM technology use sensors that can detect the subtle differences in opacity created by watermarks. These watermarks are often difficult to reproduce in counterfeit bills, providing an additional layer of security.

Examples: Watermark detection is used to identify counterfeit bills by confirming the presence and correct positioning of watermarks in the banknote.

CD (Color Detection)

Definition: Color detection (CD) is a technology that analyzes the color and print quality of banknotes to determine their authenticity.

Explanation: Cash handling machines with CD technology use high-resolution sensors to capture the color and print quality of the banknotes. Genuine currency typically has high-quality printing, while counterfeit bills often have lower quality or inaccurate color representation.

Examples: Color detection is used to identify counterfeit bills by comparing the color and print quality of the banknote to the known characteristics of genuine currency.

SD (Size Detection)

Definition: Size detection (SD) is a technology that measures the dimensions of banknotes to verify their authenticity.

Explanation: Cash handling machines with SD technology use sensors to measure the length, width, and other dimensions of banknotes. Genuine currency has specific dimensions that are difficult to reproduce accurately in counterfeit bills.

Examples: Size detection is used to identify counterfeit bills by comparing the dimensions of the banknote to the known measurements of genuine currency.

TD (Thickness Detection)

Definition: Thickness detection (TD) is a technology that measures the thickness of banknotes to determine their authenticity.

Explanation: Cash handling machines with TD technology use sensors to measure the thickness of banknotes. Genuine currency typically has a consistent thickness, while counterfeit bills may vary in thickness due to inferior manufacturing processes.

Examples: Thickness detection is used to identify counterfeit bills by comparing the thickness of the banknote to the known characteristics of genuine currency.

Conclusion

Understanding the proprietary terms used in cash handling machines is crucial for efficient cash management and counterfeit detection. Familiarizing yourself with technologies like contact image sensors, infrared detection, magnetic detection, metal thread detection, watermark detection, color detection, size detection, and thickness detection can help you make informed decisions when selecting and using cash handling machines.

Reltaed Article: The Complete Glossary Of Money Counter Terms

2 comments

  • Lawrence

    Very very good interesting explanations.

  • Harry

    Let me sum it up briefly: IR stands for infrared properties, MG stands for magnetic properties, MT refers to metallic thread (security thread), WM stands for watermark, CD stands for color detection, SD refers to size detection, and TD stands for thickness detection.

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